Sunday Salon: December

December is an odd month, if I do say so myself. For some, the month is marked with reflection; a time to assess accomplishments of the past eleven months, construct a list of to-dos before the clock strikes twelve, and formulate resolutions and goals for the new year.

For me, though, it is a month marked by intensive study and stress for the first half as the semester comes to a close (I have one exam, one project, and two presentations due on Thursday alone) followed by headaches over making that tight connection in Chicago and exhaustion only to conclude with the holidays and a few, short days of relaxation. I really do not have the time to be introspective about anything – let alone reading – as my focus is on getting through this paper so I can study for that exam.

Thus is the life of a university student, I guess.

I have some basic ideas of what I would like to read in the next year but nothing is concrete (other than the fifth edition of the What’s in a Name? Challenge). The onslaught of challenges and read-a-longs for next year has been glossed over by yours truly. I just cannot imagine committing to anything more at this time. Maybe later. Maybe after I’ve arrived back home and can leave that lengthy to-do list at school.

Do I have books I would like to read by the end of the year? Sure, I do. But most of the titles on my short list are centered around completion rather than starting.

  • Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy) – I feel off the read-a-long bandwagon after reaching the beginning of Part Four. I’m not going to concern myself with keeping up the schedule. Rather, I would just like to complete this classic by December 31st.
  • Poor Economics (Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo) – I would like to finish Part Two as Part One was quite interesting.
  • The Scarlet Letter (Nathaniel Hawthorne) – This book was the December selection for Reading Buddies over at Erin Reads. Although this is technically a reread for me, it has been seven years since I read Hawthorne’s novel.

(If you’re wondering about The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, I finished the audiobook last night at the gym. I’m hoping to have thoughts up sooner rather than later.)

I keep telling myself I just have to get through this week and so I will concentrate on my to-do list for the next few days. Then I will start thinking about next year’s reading selections, goals, and plans.

The Sunday Salon:

The Sunday Salon.com The Sunday Salon encourages bloggers to get together –at their separate desks, in their own particular time zones– every Sunday and read. And blog about their reading. And comment on one another’s blogs. Salon participants are encouraged to blog about their time spent reading, pages read, information about current reading, discuss a reaction to a book, state what they plan to read the following week, or make suggestions for a group read.

6 comments

  1. I hope you get through this week okay. I know what you mean about challenges. I’m only signing up for two: chunkster and tbr dare. There’s no way I can do anything else with next semester being so crazy. Have a great week.

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    • I’d love to do the chunkster challenge but I’m finding that I really need to be able to listen to audiobooks or read ebooks in order for me to finish (and comprehend better, if the book is classic) the larger works. Good luck with the TBR Dare. I’d love to join that one but it always starts while I’m at home and have access to the public library.

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  2. My decision for 2011: more read-alongs, less challenges. I’m going to read W&P over the whole of next year in audiobook. 61 hours, meaning about 5 hours a month. I think it’s doable!

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