The Postcard by Beverly Lewis

Postcard After suffering the tragedy of early widowhood, Plain Rachel Yoder is so shadowed by grief that even her young daughter has trouble coaxing Rachel out of her shell. Philip Bradley’s arrives at the Orchard Guest House Bed and Breakfast and stumbles across a forsaken postcard in the crevice of an antique desk. A world-weary journalist, Philip finds his enthusiasm renewed at the challenge the postcard presents. Written in Pennsylvania Dutch and signed by an infamous Plain relative, the faded message leads Philip to the beside of a woman with a tale of dark secrets and lost love.

I was relieved to find out at the library today that there is a sequel to The Postcard because while this is my favorite Beverly Lewis book, I was extremely disappointed in the ending. Actually, there’s isn’t an ending; The Postcard chugs along and drops off a cliff. Every other Beverly Lewis book has had at least some semblance of an ending and an epilogue, but The Postcard is excluded from this staple.

All of the characters felt extremely real to me, and its extremely easy to slip right into the tale of Rachel, her daughter, and Philip. The Postcard also has a great mix of mystery and redemption within its pages that really sets it apart from Lewis’ other formulaic stories.

Book Mentioned:

  • Lewis, Beverly. The Postcard (Amish County Crossroads, Book One). Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House, 1999. Print. 314 pgs. ISBN: 9780764222115. Source: Library.
Book Cover © Bethany House. Retrieved: June 24, 2009.

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